Tag Archives: American Heart Association

Right Call; Wrong Reason

There were several news stories last week that reported that Pfizer had abandoned its efforts to have its Lipitor brand of atorvastatin made available over the counter, without a prescription. I was never a big fan of OTC statins (more on that later) but I was struck by the reason that Pfizer put out:

The study did not meet its primary objectives of demonstrating patient compliance with the direction to check their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level and, after checking their LDL-C level, take appropriate action based on their test results. 

Left unstated (and unclear) in this is exactly what the appropriate action was supposed to be. I guess they were implying that patients were supposed to check how they responded to the drug and then figure out if they should keep taking it, change the dose or seek professional advice about next steps.
Continue reading Right Call; Wrong Reason

Rethinking a No-Brainer

What does someone having a heart attack look like? I think the New York Times captured what many of us probably have in mind, when they published this picture as part of a recent series on advances in cardiovascular care:

Nash_Blog_ImageMark Makela for The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/21/health/saving-heart-attack-victims-stat.html

Here is the iconic middle-aged guy, in extremis, pointing to his chest, with a team of health care professionals at the bedside. There are also signs of initial management – he has ECG electrodes on his chest, an IV in his left arm, what looks like monitor/defibrillator pads on his right chest and below his left arm and, of course, an oxygen mask.

What is wrong with this picture?
Continue reading Rethinking a No-Brainer

Practice Guidelines and Quality Care

As I have noted previously I have a “love-hate” relationship with practice guidelines. Love because it is often helpful to refer to a set of evidence-based recommendations as part of clinical decision-making; hate because of all of the shortcomings of the guidelines themselves, as well as the evidence upon which they are based. Continue reading Practice Guidelines and Quality Care

Practice Guideline Overload

I think I am like many practicing physicians in my “love-hate” relationship with clinical practice guidelines. On the one hand, it is often helpful to look up a set of evidence-based recommendations on a particular clinical issue, and I feel particularly fortunate that the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association have collaborated to produce high quality guidelines on a wide-range of subjects relevant to my practice. On the other hand, I am well aware of the shortcomings of practice guidelines, including the limitations of the underlying evidence base, the challenge of synthesizing the available evidence into guidelines, and the often limited applicability of recommendations to clinical practice. Continue reading Practice Guideline Overload