Tag Archives: JAMA

Professionalism

Every so often the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is devoted to a single topic. The May 12 edition was devoted to “professionalism and governance” and the articles addressed a range of related subjects from medical education to board certification. I was particularly drawn, for obvious reasons, to the section on “professionalism and employment.”

I think it is fair to say that physicians have often cited their commitment to professionalism as a justification for the high value placed on independent private practice. That is, independence – of insurance companies, corporate overlords or pretty much anybody telling them how to practice – is the only way to assure that they can consistently act in the best interests of their patients.

This way of thinking is now severely challenged.

Continue reading Professionalism

Looking for the Pony

There is an old gag about an intensely optimistic child whose bright outlook on life is so irrepressible that when he is presented with a room full of manure for Christmas, he screams with delight, convinced that there “must be pony in there someplace.” Continue reading Looking for the Pony

Practice Guidelines and Quality Care

As I have noted previously I have a “love-hate” relationship with practice guidelines. Love because it is often helpful to refer to a set of evidence-based recommendations as part of clinical decision-making; hate because of all of the shortcomings of the guidelines themselves, as well as the evidence upon which they are based. Continue reading Practice Guidelines and Quality Care

Great Night

I had a wonderful experience last night, hosting a dinner in honor of the recipients of our first annual Patients’ Choice Award, given to the 5 physicians with the best scores on the outpatient patient satisfaction survey. As readers of this blog know, I don’t like the term “patient satisfaction,” because it seems like such a simplistic measure and a low bar. I think that quality care and effective communication require a lot more than “satisfying” patients. Continue reading Great Night