Tag Archives: Patients

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

I had a recent conversation with an old friend about her elderly father that encapsulates a lot of what is both great and terribly wrong with healthcare in America today.

Here are the basic facts: the man is in his mid-80s, retired from teaching school, and is active and vigorous, living in the community; he is cognitively intact. He has a history of coronary disease and had an intracoronary stent placed some years back. He is asymptomatic on a typical “cocktail” of meds including aspirin, a statin, and an ACE inhibitor. Over the summer, he had a routine follow-up visit with his cardiologist, who detected a carotid bruit. After a duplex sonogram and a CT angio, a high-grade unilateral internal carotid stenosis was identified, and carotid endarterectomy surgery was recommended. My friend called me to see if I could recommend a surgeon in the city where she and her father both live.

Continue reading The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Health Numeracy

There is a growing awareness of the importance of health literacy – the extent to which patients and their families are able to understand words we speak and the written materials we provide. This is a good thing, since there is very good evidence that patients who have a better understanding of their condition and recommended treatment feel better, adhere better to recommendations, enjoy better health outcomes and rate the experience of their care higher. Oh, and they also sue for malpractice less frequently. The problem for providers is that it is not easy to get this right. Continue reading Health Numeracy

The Next Wave

I was traveling recently and, as I typically do, I bought a copy of Fast Company magazine to read on the plane. I don’t subscribe, but I find that it often has interesting articles on the intersection of technology and business. In the July/August issue, there was an article about GE and its CEO Jeff Immelt that I think has important parallels with the current transformation of healthcare delivery. Continue reading The Next Wave

Independence and Autonomy

With the approach of the 4th of July, I have had “independence” on my mind. In my professional role, I always have “autonomy” on my mind, since it is often at the top of the list of things that doctors care deeply about, and I have been kicking around how the two relate to one another.

Webster’s (OK, the on-line Merriam-Webster dictionary) defines “independence” as “freedom from outside control or support” and offers up “self-sufficiency” and “self-reliance” as synonyms. “Autonomy” is defined as “the quality or state of being self-governing” and suggests “self-determination” among the synonyms.

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Looking for the Pony

There is an old gag about an intensely optimistic child whose bright outlook on life is so irrepressible that when he is presented with a room full of manure for Christmas, he screams with delight, convinced that there “must be pony in there someplace.” Continue reading Looking for the Pony

Recognizing Excellence

I am a big believer in celebrating success and recognizing excellence. I find that doing so motivates people to achieve even more, and it helps maintain a healthy sense of organizational optimism. I also believe that one of the keys to making this work is to set high standards, so that only truly high performers get the accolades. Continue reading Recognizing Excellence